Journalist & drummer working in Fargo, ND. Hablo castellano. I like music, stick-ball and vidja games. My brother calls me "Bags." It's a long story.

Some of the oldest posts on this blog were made when I was a senior in college. I look back on them and laugh at myself, so you should, too.

I'm still figuring out what I want to do with this blog. Until then, you'll see stuff that I like or find interesting, and that's about it. Reblogs and likes mean I find it interesting, not that I agree with it necessarily. Enjoy.

 

Despite the help of a lawyer, Reynoso has not been able to determine exactly how much he owes, or even what company holds his loans. Just as happened with home mortgages in the boom years before the 2008 financial crash, his son’s student loans have been sold and resold, and at least one was likely bundled into a complex Wall Street security. But the trail of those transactions ends at a wall of corporate silence from companies that include two household names: banking giant UBS and Xerox, which owns the loan servicer handling the bulk of his loans. Left without answers is a bereaved father.

Journalism is printing what someone else does not want printed: everything else is public relations.

George Orwell (@JPBarlow)

futurejournalismproject:

Forbes worked with Bitly to suss out where Americans get their news state by state.
Mapped above are the favorites.
Jon Bruner explains how the data was collected here.
H/T: Flowing Data.

I love how Minnesota is represented by The Onion. Love it. 

futurejournalismproject:

Forbes worked with Bitly to suss out where Americans get their news state by state.

Mapped above are the favorites.

Jon Bruner explains how the data was collected here.

H/T: Flowing Data.

I love how Minnesota is represented by The Onion. Love it. 

Killing Reporters Now a Federal Offense in Mexico

futurejournalismproject:

The Mexican senate passed a bill yesterday that makes killing reporters — and any infringement on freedom of information — a federal offense. As we noted earlier, 40 journalists have been killed in Mexico since 2006 with very little follow through in police investigations.

The hope is that elevating such crimes to the federal level will lead to better investigations and prosecutions. The belief being that there’s less corruption at that level.

Via Reporters Without Borders:

The federal senate’s 95 members yesterday unanimously passed an amendment to article 73 of the constitution allowing the federal courts and investigators to deal with crimes that threaten the work of journalists and freedom of information. The amendment was already approved by the lower house last November.

The amendment says: “The federal authorities will also be able to try crimes under state jurisdiction when they are linked to federal crimes or when they are crimes against journalists, persons or installations that affect, limit or impinge on the right to information or the freedoms of expression and publication.” 

Mexico is ranked 149 out of 179 countries on Reporters Without Borders annual press freedom index.